Propane vs. Natural Gas

Propane vs. Natural gas in Missouri

What is the difference between using propane or natural gas to heat your Missouri home?

While natural gas is the leading home heating source in many parts of the country, most people don’t realize that many of the benefits of natural gas translate to propane as well. Whether it’s a super-efficient furnace, unlimited hot water, temperature-precise cooking stoves or reliable backup home generators, you can count on all of these benefits in your propane-powered home in the same way people do in homes supplied with natural gas.

Why propane over natural gas?

Surveys have shown that people like heating their home and water with propane because they know they will have a reliable supply of propane on hand whenever they need it. Having a propane tank on their property gives them the ability to store a plentiful supply that’s always ready for immediate use.

Your propane supplier has several ways to ensure that you will always have plenty of clean, dependable propane on hand, even during the longest, coldest months, by offering keep-full, pre-buy or other plans to suit your needs. Unlike natural gas or electricity, propane customers can contract for and store their energy supply on-site for the ultimate security when winter hits. With more than 100 companies serving the Show Me State, Missouri’s propane consumers also have many local options for price, service and terms. Just try shopping for natural gas or electricity—these providers have monopoly territories that don’t permit competition and can’t lock in your service or supply.

Natural gas consumers have less reason to feel confident. That’s because most of the natural gas supply is dependent on old, undersized pipelines, which causes supply concerns during periods of cold weather and high demand. This leads to the question: Can you always count on getting natural gas piped into your home during periods of extremely cold weather?

Environmental issues have also been raised about methane leaks coming from crumbling underground natural gas pipelines. (Methane is a greenhouse gas and the main component of natural gas.) In its original form, propane is not a greenhouse gas and it’s considered a “green” fuel because of its low carbon content.

In terms of supply, propane has an edge over natural gas because of the way it’s processed and transported. After propane gets compressed into a liquid, all of this liquid petroleum gas (LPG) gets stored inside large tanks until your propane company delivers it to you. The propane gets released slowly and safely from the tank and goes through a valve, which is when the liquid propane turns into a gas again.

Here’s one more thing to feel good about: All of the propane consumed in the U.S. is produced in North America. So every gallon of propane you buy contributes to America’s energy independence.

Safe, clean, efficient, abundant and made in the U.S—that’s propane!